Posts Tagged ‘Microphone’

The Daredevil Cam is Closer to Those with this Info and a FPGA

Thursday, August 4th, 2016

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Hello FPGA hobbyists! Ever wondered what it would be like to see sound? The author thveryat very same curiosity for close to 10 years, and kept a constant vigilance for ideas to build something that would help him materialize his dreams. The Daredevil camera, built using a bunch of MEMS microphones and a FPGA actually lets you see sound.
The author started the project wielding inspiration from the Duga RADAR. However, the scale of the project becomes huge and something beyond what hobbyists can afford. The author then tried a more practical but tedious and time consuming design approach which involved using an array of microphones. Each microphone in the array picks the sound relative to its position and displays it on screen, which will always be different from the next microphone because of the difference in position.
While the logic behind this is sound, implementing an array of microphones, each having a Pre-amp stage and then an ADC stage before feeding inputs to the FPGA is not practical. The cost and time put into the project becomes huge, and even then error margins can be significantly high.
This is the reason why the author used a set of MEMS microphones. MEMS microphones have an inbuilt Pre-amp and ADC stage, and thus the project collapses in complexity. All that is needed is an array of MEMS microphones and an FPGA board to implement the project. FPGAs are FFT friendly and this has a huge part in the project.
The author has shared the PCB design layout here. Besides this a number of fail safes such as spare patterns for a Flash chip, SOIC and DIP. He also used micro SD cards for each array to store the data and send it for processing to get an output of close to 30 frames per second. The FPGA, a great tool for pipelining is used to get his output.
The author then tried out the theory in an 8×8 array and arrived at the conclusions that the device is pretty sensitive as it even picks up sound way reflections from surfaces. But since anechoic chambers are impossible to build at home, he went on to build a 16×16 array.
While the results can be seen in this page, the author is yet to perfect his design. There are persistent issues with micro SD card since its storage algorithm conveniently cuts off data to compress data, which is essential for the FPGA to build a 30 Frame/sec output.
To be heard…or seen.

 

By Artem Litvinovich