Posts Tagged ‘game’

How to Whack a Mole with your FPGA, but Not Physically!

Tuesday, November 1st, 2016

https://youtu.be/pausAon7RFw

Good day FPGA Enthusiasts! FPGAs can be used for a versatile set of applications from real time engineering solutions to building funny games. Today’s post is going to focus on the latter where we build yet another game concept using a FPGA board (you may need to adapt your own). The game in consideration is a simple version of ‘Whack a Mole’. Since the FPGA already has a segment display, Switches and LEDs the peripherals required to run the game are minimum.

The only Hardware required for building this game (you may need more parts depending on your FPGA board) is a FPGA and 3 LEDs (2 of the same color preferably red and one different color preferably white or green). Since only 3 LEDs are being used, you can simply plug them right into the FPGA without using a breadboard or jumpers as shown by the author.

The entire project uses a simple architecture that houses 5 key components which are the LFSR, Score keeper, Clock divider, LED controller and the 7 segment display. Each component significance and working principle has been detailed by the author.

The coding has been done in simple modules and each module has been shared under the corresponding architectural component explanation. The coding language used is VHDL (.vhd) and the code is easy to follow and relate to.

Though the game is fun, there are a few bugs in the code which can be corrected to make the game truly addictive and perfect.

Whack down all those bugs and enjoy!

By fuzmike2

How to Build an Arcade Obstacle Avoidance Game Using FPGA

Tuesday, September 6th, 2016

Image result for obstacle avoidance game

Hello FPGA innovators! Remember the arcade obstacle avoidance game where blocks of pixels fall on you and you steer clear of them moving left or right? Today’s project attempts to re engineer the same game using a VGA and FPGA. Here, a pseudo random code is used to generate obstacles that fall down and buttons on the FPGA are used to move the cursor so that none of the obstacles hit it.

The only hardware required to execute this project is an FPGA board (you might need to adapt yours if different from the author’s), a computer monitor and connection cables. This is because the FPGA board has inbuilt push buttons that can be used to move the cursor of the game, and also has the necessary DACs and VGA interfaces required to run the game.

The coding done by the author is in VHDL and everything starting from a functional flowchart to running the bit file for FPGA has been described from steps 1 to 9. Since the buttons on the FPGA has a bouncing issue, a separate debouncer code needs to be run which is available on step 2. Details regarding the VGA, coding for random obstacles and checking for collisions and updating the game are given from steps 3 to 7.

Though the authors put in 50+ hours of effort and made a great attempt, the game still could be done in a lot more simpler ways. The main code is available in the introduction to spare other followers from putting in more additional effort, but starting from choosing a different FPGA board to running through basics of other games implemented using VGA and FPGA can end up delivering something better with a lot less effort.

Give it a try and have fun!

Lose Yourself in the LED Timer Game with FPGA

Tuesday, May 24th, 2016

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Hey FPGA lovers! If you have ever been a fan of arcade games, here is a chance for you to re live the glory days! The LED timer game with FPGA consists of an LED-button interfacing with FPGA. The project is really simple to implement and it is a great first project for FPGA aspirants. The game is similar to the moving light arcade game, where you press a button when a particular color LED glows. As you progress the game gets faster and harder!

The hardware requirements for the project are a FPGA board, Male to Male jumpers, 10 LEDs (9 of which are the same color) and breadboards. The project has been coded by the author for a 10 LED version. The wiring details are given in step 7. However you can extend this to any number of LEDs once you go through the code.

Though any board can be used for this project, the author has shared VHDL codes for Nexys 3. So here you have a good challenge adapting the given code to your FPGA. Another interesting aspect is that you may need to adapt the implementation of the button that is required for the game. So the hardware interfacing not only involves connecting LEDs to FPGA, but thinking a bit outside of the box to get around this minor drawback.

The pieces of software required for this project are Xilinx and Adept. The code has been broken into modules and explained well in step 5. The code consists of a number of modules in VHDL (.vhd) that consists of using the primary button for playing, Display for keeping score and LEDs for driving the game.

The author has done a great job in providing clear instructions and the codes have been written following simple logic. Another major factor is the flexibility in scale of the project where you can implement this game to cover 10 LEDs or even 100s of them. Game on!

 

By ekchen35649

Build Your Own Digitized Tic Tac Toe with FPGA

Friday, May 13th, 2016

F01UDFMI3H4XTYT.MEDIUMGreetings FPGA enthusiasts! Today’s project is a rather exciting one where we will attempt to build a Digitized Version of the popular Tic Tac Toe game with FPGA. This Tic Tac Toe FPGA implementation is pretty simple so this is a great project for a newbie too. So game on!

The Hardware requirements are pretty decent and the cost of this project is quite affordable. The things you will need are breadboards, buttons, LEDs (preferably 3 colors), jumper cables and the your FPGA board.

The entire project is based upon how to build a single LED controller with FPGA, and once you do master this, you can extend it to building your conventional 3×3 array. Once you build a multi LED controller, simply interface them with the FPGA using a XOR network as the author has described. Follow the given steps for interconnections and take care while using the PMOD port since the author did lose a few LEDs to it!

Once the interfacing part is done, you can start programming in VHDL (.vhd) to code the victory conditions. An interesting thing is that these conditions are coded only using 2 “if” loops, but they are substantial in size. An interesting challenge in the project will be to code for “tie” cases. A separate module has been used by the author to reduce the complexity in the code and make it easily decipherable.

If you would like to jump right into the game you can download the zip file in step 10 and implement it using VHDL and the .bit file using Adept. The codes have been well segregated into modules and are pretty easy to understand even if you are new to the FPGA world! Simply wire the components as shown, and download the code into your FPGA board to start gaming.

 

By RyanFrawley

 

 

Get Ready to Bop It! With FPGA

Tuesday, April 26th, 2016

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Hello FPGA enthusiasts! Today we have a close enough version of the popular Bop It! Game. For those unfamiliar with what a Bop It! Game is, I will tell you that it is practically a quick reflex based game that has a set of voice commands that give you instructions to perform tasks with the console.

As the game progresses, it gets faster paced and this is the challenge for any FPGA enthusiast.

There are basically 4 main points in this project:

  1. Figuring out the right functionalities and the right modules to use for them. Integrating them with your FPGA and coding it.
  2. Figuring the clock cycles needed for each module and ensuring that the separate clocks don’t clash with the main module of the program.
  3. LED displays instead of voice prompts are a stroke of genius from the author, but integrating this too can be a bit of work.
  4. External button compatibility with FPGA is the final and most crucial challenge, but where there is a will, there is a way!

The codes have been implemented in .vhd (VHDL) formats for easy compatibility with the hardware and the author has provided the different modules. This way the code can be better understood as it is broken into parts.

If you plan on implementing your own functionalities in the console you will have to key in your own codes and this can be a welcome challenge.

So embrace the opportunity to learn FPGA in a new light, and don’t forget to Bop It!

By omrinissan2013

Ever dreamt of playing Tetris on a wall of your room? Now it´s possible!

Thursday, December 24th, 2015

https://youtu.be/qLTDpezTzxg

Remember all those days looking at a small screen following the tiny cubes falling down quicker and quicker…? Never again! Those days are gone and for good. We are not saying that you no longer have to play Tetris, just that you don´t have to do it on a small screen.

Today´s tutorial will teach you how to build your own Giant Tetris. You read it right, giant. The one used in the article is 6 ft tall, but you can adapt it to your needs…or just to the height of your ceiling.

All you need is a grid of RGB LEDs and a Papilio FPGA board, follow each step of this thorough tutorial and build your own Giant Tetris!

By Sam_Sharp