Posts Tagged ‘ARM’

Visualize Music with a Muscled FPGA

Tuesday, September 13th, 2016

Picture of LED Music Visualizer with Zybo Board

The Zybo Board is one of the most powerful tools in FPGA and this is because it is FPGA combined with an ARM processor that widens the spectrum of possibilities with FPGA. Today’s post is yet another dive into Zybo’s possibilities and in this project a visualization of audio signals or music will be accomplished. The author has been very detailed about this project and has explained every aspect of it in 18 steps.

The Hardware needed for carrying out this project are the Zybo Zynq 7000 FPGA board, a neo pixel LED matrix, a 5V 10 A power supply, a female DC power adapter, 3 pin male to male header, a 1mF capacitor, an audio splitter and some jumper wires. The connection diagram is provided by the author in step 17.

The code basically uses the principle of FFTs to detect frequency components in the audio file. Depending upon the magnitude of frequencies received, the LED display has been programmed to light up. 16 steps starting from opening Vivado to run the code to generating a bit file for the FPGA has been provided by the author. You can download a zip file which contains all modules relevant to the project. The author has used a combination of C, custom Verilog and HDL to code the project. This gives an ease in defining GPIO ports and makes the circuit a lot simpler.

Another interesting aspect is that the FPGA has been so coded that with the help of switches, your LED matrix can either act as a spectrogram or as a visualizer seen in media players.

Let me challenge you to achieve similar results adapting your own FPGA!

By jtdykstra

Build Your Own Globe of Persistence with FPGA

Thursday, September 8th, 2016

https://youtu.be/I-0oLg9Pwpk

Hey there FPGA lovers! The human eye is far from being perfect, and this imperfection helps us in coming up with a lot of ideas and products (take the television for example!). Today’s post exploits the Human eye’s persistence of vision to build a globe of persistence using FPGA. These globes can be used to build circular LED displays using just 1 column of LEDs which make them highly cost effective and fun to build with FPGA.

The trick when it comes to the globe of persistence is to balance the RPM of the globe and the timing of the LEDs switching colour. The author has shared details regarding the hardware needed for the project in the introduction. An FPGA board (you may need to adapt yours for this project), a neopixel 12 LED strip, a 12 wire slip ring, a photo interrupter and a photo interrupter breakout board, a 12V DC motor, a micro SD card and a cross compiler for ARM processors.

The project also needs an interfacing board for the FPGA and globe which has been explained in step 2. Building the globe’s mechanical structure with the DC motor has been explained in detail in step 5, and soldering the wires in the right way has been shared by the author too.

The author has gone to great lengths to explain how to execute the project. Step 1 gives complete details about generating an FSBL file and a PDF in case you have doubts. The coding for the project has been done in Linux. But even if you are unfamiliar with Linux, the author has explained Linux for FPGA in detail in steps 3 and 4. The code has been broken down to modules, and there are clear instructions available on how to program the FPGA. Step 7 is the final step that explains how to get your globe working, and also gives details regarding building custom applications using the globe of persistence and FPGA.

 Have fun!

By NicolasD3